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Niall Ferguson

Time Magazine's "100 Most Influential People in the World"

Named by Times Magazine as one of the 100 Most Influential People in the World, Ferguson is a public intellectual whose work impacts industry, finance, government, and academia. He is currently a Senior Research Fellow at Oxford University, and a Senior Fellow of the Hoover Institution, Stanford University, and Professor of International History at Harvard University. Controversial, expansive, and eloquent, Ferguson has been called “the most talented British historian of his generation.”

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Lexington, Massachusetts, USA

Presentations

Captivating and witty, Niall Ferguson is a sensation at Global Investment and Executive Thought Leader events. Named by Time Magazine as one of the 100 Most Influential People in the World, Ferguson is a public intellectual whose work impacts industry, finance, government, and academia. A prolific commentator on contemporary economics and politics for the American and British press, his work regularly appears in the New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Foreign Affairs, the New York Review of Books and many other publications.

An accomplished speaker, Ferguson’s presentations are celebrated for their scintillating wit and their analytical clarity. Among his numerous speech topics:

Political Risk and the Global Business Environment

The Ascent and Descent of Money: What Went Wrong with Western Finance?

Globalization: Past, Present and Possible Futures

Is the United States an Empire? Should it be?

Are Capitalism and Democracy Bound to Win?

High Liquidity and Low Volatility in Historical Perspective

To Have and Have Not: Commodities in the Long Run

Business Empires: How Big Companies Rise and Fall

  • "Niall Ferguson is a hoot! He had the audience in the palm of his hand in two seconds!" - Distinguished Lecturer Series Vero Beach
  • "Ferguson is the most brilliant British historian of his generation." - The Times

Summary Profile

Niall Ferguson is one of the world’s leading historians of the global economy and author of such internationally-acclaimed works as- Colossus: The Price of America’s Empire; The Pity of War; The Cash Nexus: Money and Power in the Modern World; Empire: The Rise and Demise of the British World Order and the Lessons for Global Power and the award-winning History of the House of Rothschild.

Controversial, expansive, and eloquent, Ferguson has been called “the most talented British historian of his generation.” But the ambitious themes he explores in his work have urgent relevance to the present as well as the past: the costs and benefits of economic globalization; the interface between finance and politics; the lessons to be learned from the British experience of empire; and most recently, the strengths and limitation of American global power.

“Politically, it may not be what people want to hear,” says Ferguson of his new book, Colossus: The Price of America’s Empire, “but as an historian I can’t ignore the resemblances between the United States today and the great empires of the past. Americans need to recognize what they have in common with the Romans and the Victorians.”

Named by Times Magazine as one of the 100 Most Influential People in the World, Ferguson is a public intellectual whose work impacts industry, finance, government, and academia. He is currently a Senior Research Fellow at Oxford University, and a Senior Fellow of the Hoover Institution, Stanford University, and Professor of International History at Harvard University.

A prolific commentator on contemporary economics and politics for the American and British press (as well as an experienced radio and television presenter), his work regularly appears in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Foreign Affairs, The New York Review of Books and many other publications.

An accomplished speaker, Ferguson’s presentations are celebrated for their scintillating wit and their analytical clarity. Among his numerous speech topics: * Globalization: Past, Present and Possible Futures * Is the United States an Empire? Should it be? * Are Capitalism and Democracy Bound to Win?